Topic

Acceptance of Culture and Self and Personal Identification

Title

Personal Journeys and Self Discovery

Students will analyze how individuals transform as a result of conflict and life trials including how the setting impacts the characters and events(specfically conflicts) in the text. They will
analyze the change in a character that occurs as a result of these conflicts and how the character becomes better for the obstacles they must overcome. They will analyze the motives, qualities and contradictions of a character as they arise as a result of the conflicts they face.

Focus on Common Core Standards


RL.9-10.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
RL.9-10.2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
RL.9-10.3. Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
RL.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).
RL.9-10.5. Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.
RL.9-10.6. Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.
W.9-10.1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
  • Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.
  • Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.
  • Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
  • Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.
W.9-10.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
  • Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  • Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
  • Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.
  • Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic.
  • Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
  • Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).
SL.9-10.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
  • Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed.
  • Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.
  • Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.
SL.9-10.2. Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.
SL.9-10.3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.
L.9-10.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
  • Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron) in context and analyze their role in the text.
  • Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.
L.9-10.6. Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
RI.9-10.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
RI.9-10.2. Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
RI.9-10.3. Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
RI.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).
RI.9-10.5. Analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).
RI.9-10.6. Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.

Suggested Student Objectives


SWBAT
  • analyze how individuals transform as a result of conflict and life trials
  • evaluate how setting impacts the characters and events in the text
  • analyze the change in a character that occurs as a result of life circumstances
  • explore the changing social structures within a work of fiction and compare it to similar instances in the non-fiction texts
  • compare and contrast points of view in arguements presented on related issues
  • analyze the motives, qualities and contradictions of a character

Suggested Additional Readings


Novels: (choose a minimum of one)
How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accent by Sandra Cisneros
Freaky Green Eyes by Joyce Carole Oates
The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams
The Pearl by John Steinbeck
Half Broke Horses by Jeannette Walls
The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls
The Miracle Worker by William Gibson
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

Short Stories:
"The Lottery" by Shirley Jackson
"To Build A Fire" by Jack London
"Everyday Use" by Alice Walker
"A Christmas Memory" by Truman Capote
"The Seven Ages of Man" by William Shakespeare
"Through the Tunnel" by Doris Lessing

Poems:
"Song of the Open Road" by Walt Whitman,
"Since feeling is First" by EE Cummings,
"If" by Rudyard Kipling
"Reluctance and Self Acceptance" byJonathan Robin
"Discovery of the Self" by Lawrence Pertillar

Non fiction/ Informational Texts:
Article from Newsday on John Steinbeck

Excerpt from Angela’s Ashes,
Journey to America by Judith Ortiz Cofer,
Excerpt from Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer,

"Writting Outside the Bar": A Journey of Self Discovery by Maureen Geraghty and Jevon Jackson
"Deposition of conclusions of life's philosophy" by Richard Rose
"Cultural Identity and Diaspora" by Stuart Hall
"Cultural variations and the response to emotional distress" by Lawrence J. Kirmayer

Art and Media:
Balston Beach, Cape Cod by Charles Sovek
Ice Blue by Susan Shatter
Reflections by Ken Danby

Terminology/ Literary Elements:
Characterization
Magical Realism
Antagonist
Imagery
Metaphors
Point of View
Conflict
Symbolism
Foreshadowing
Theme
Perspective
Dramatic Irony
Setting


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